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Voted Best Comedy Show in Rhode Island
2017, 2016 & 2013
2017Winner

2016 Motif Award

2013 Motif Award
 
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Games We Play
Welcome to our Games Page! Bring Your Own Improv invites audience volunteers to play along, if they wish. The game descriptions below are provided so that you can have a basic idea of how a game works before you volunteer. Don’t worry, the cast is there to help you. Should you choose to volunteer, the cast will guide you and help you to have a good time on stage with us!
Action Figures
Two players attempt to create a scene, but they can only move their eyes and mouths. During the scene, two other players, called movers, must gently guide every movement as if the players were a doll or an action figure. Physically grasping and moving arms, legs and hands is acceptable. A simple tap to the back, side or front of the leg will prompt the “action figure” to move that leg.

A Day in the Life
Right after interviewing the Featured Audience Member, the cast will sometimes play this freeform game using the answers. Players will perform a selection of scenes that reenact an average day in the life of our FAM. All basic improv editing tools may be used.

Alphabet
This scene game consists of 26 lines of dialogue. Two players start on stage and the host gets a suggestion for the scene, in addition to a letter to start the dialogue with. For example, if the letter picked was “L” then the next letter would be “M” and so on through the alphabet. Players take turns alternating between the letters. When a player gets to the letter “Z,” then they loop back to the letter “A.” If a player uses the wrong letter, takes too long, uses a weird word, or doesn’t help the scene move forward, then they are replaced by a player waiting in the line off stage. The host can change the scene and pick a new letter after a player is replaced.

Back in My Day...
Players line up on stage and the host gets suggestions from the audience for occupations, objects, famous people, etc. The host gives a suggestion and players step forward one at a time to deliver a punchline or one liner, returning to their spot in the line when they’re done. If the suggestion was “tour guide,” the format would be “Back in my day we didn’t have tour guides, and people got lost a lot more often.” After a few players step up, the host gives a new suggestion.

Because I Said So
Two players stand on either side of the host, who is sitting in a chair on stage. The rest of the players stand in a line off stage. In this game, the host is a young child with one question on their mind, “why?” The two players on stage are the child’s parents and have to do their best to answer the constant questions. The host gets a suggestion from the audience and asks one parent a question inspired by it. After the parent responds, the child turns to the other parent with the dreaded question “why?” That parent has to come up with a response, and the child asks the other parent “why?” This continues until one of the parents freezes, says a response that is too advanced for a child, or can’t think of anything and yells “Because I said so!” The parent that does any of these things is eliminated and is replaced by one of the players waiting off stage.

Blank Walks into a Bar
Players form a line on stage and the host gets occupations, locations, objects, etc. from the audience. Players step up one at a time and deliver one liners and punchlines about the suggestion and return to their spot in the line when they are done. If the suggestion was “waiter,” the format would be “A waiter walks into a bar and spills all of his drinks.” From time to time, the host calls out a new suggestion.

Busta Rap
A handful of players form a line on stage for this song game. The host asks the audience for a one syllable word and the players take turns going down the line telling a story in the form of a rap. The last word in each of the lines has to rhyme with whatever word was given by the host, meaning it’s an AAA etc. rhyme scheme. Players are allowed to slant rhyme. If the rhymes aren’t close enough to the original word, the players aren’t telling a story, or a player freezes, the host calls out the player and asks them to join the sick backup crew behind the line. After a player is called out, the host gets a new one syllable word and the rap starts over again. Players compete with each other until only the true rap master is left. The host gets one last suggestion and the rap master does a solo rap for as long as they can.

Catch Phrase
Three people start on stage for this scene game. The host asks the audience for two simple statements and two simple questions. Examples of sentences could be “Why are we stuck here?” and “Look behind you!” One statement and one question are given to two players, and they can ONLY use these catch phrases during the scene. They are allowed to change the inflection and punctuation, but they can’t change the order of the words. The third player has to try and have a normal scene and can say whatever they want.

Centerpiece
This game is similar to Revolver, but with five players. Four players, A, B, C, and D each pick one corner of the stage, and player E stands in the center. The host gets a suggestion for a scene from the audience and assigns it to players A, B, and E on the front of the stage. The host then says “rotate right” and everyone rotates clockwise on the stage. Then the host gets another suggestion and players B, C, and E have a separate, new scene together. Rotate right again, new suggestion, and players C, D, and E have a separate scene together. Rotate right one more time, new suggestion, and players D, A, and E have a separate scene together. Throughout the game, the host will be rotating between these four scenes by either calling “rotate right,” known as clockwise, or “rotate left,” known as counterclockwise. Each time the scenes are revisited after rotating, the players can pick up right where they left off or go hours, months, or years into the future. Player E has to remember all of the scenes, in addition to their characters in each scene.

Chainsaw
A large handful of players are picked for this guessing game. One player stays and the rest leave the room. The host gets three things from the audience: an occupation, a location, and an object, otherwise known as OLO. The player that stayed in the room knows all of the suggestions and has to give hints to one of the players that left the room. The catch is that hints need to be given in order and can only be given by miming and speaking gibberish. When the guessing player thinks they know the occupation they’ll clap, when they think they know the location they’ll clap, and when they think they know the object they’ll kill the other player with it. A new player enters the room and the process is repeated with the player who just guessed now giving hints. When all of the players have guessed, everyone lines up so the last player who came in is at one end and the first player to give hints is at the other end. The host asks the last player who came in what they thought each suggestion was, and we work our way down the line until the occupation, location, and object are correctly identified.

Curtain Call
Players stand on stage for this song game at the end of the show. The pattern is an AABB rhyme scheme, meaning that player one and two have to rhyme the last word they say with each other, and player three and four have to rhyme their different last word with each other. Players step forward one at a time and sing a line about different things that happened during the show. After four players sing a line, everyone sings the chorus and the verse is completed. This process is repeated until a high point is reached.

Dating Game
This guessing game is based off of a blind dating show. One player, the bachelor or bachelorette, leaves the room. Three other players, the contestants, are given their identities by the host. The host gets suggestions for people, places, objects, emotions, etc. and assigns them to the contestants. The bachelor(ette) comes back in the room and asks the contestants questions to figure out who or what they are. The contestants give hints about their identity in their answers to the questions. The game ends when the bachelor(ette) picks their favorite contestant or decides they don’t like any of the contestants.

Debate Club
Players form a line on the back of the stage. The host plays the part of moderator and gets a suggestion from the audience that becomes the topic of a heated debate. All of the players are experts on everything, and one of them steps forward to begin the debate. If a player in the line doesn’t agree with what’s being said at the exact moment it is brought up, they can raise their hand and yell “challenge!” If the moderator accepts the challenge, the player who challenged will take the place of the player who was just talking. If the moderator declines the challenge, the player who was just talking continues to speak. As the game goes on, the challenges come more frequently and tend to be more absurd. The most important part of this game is that whoever is speaking cannot ever stop talking unless there is a challenge.

Do Run
In this game, five players work together to tell a story by singing a song one line at a time. The pattern for this game is an AABBB rhyme scheme. This means that player one and two have to rhyme the last word they say with each other, but players three, four, and five only have to rhyme the last word they say with themselves. For example, player one’s last word was “cat,” so player two’s rhyme could be ”hat.” Player three’s last word was “dream,” so player four could say “steam,” and player five could say “cream.” Once all five players have sung a line, the verse is complete and the next player in line begins the second verse. The game ends when five verses have been sung.

Everything Emporium
There are four players for this guessing game. One player, the shopkeeper, is guessing and leaves the room. The host gets three unique objects from the audience and assigns them to three customers. These objects could be something like a singing vacuum cleaner, chainsaw flavored bubble gum, or something else entirely because at the Everything Emporium, there is literally everything. The shopkeeper comes back in and has to guess while the customers give hints about what they’re looking for. When the shopkeeper is close to guessing right, the audience snaps and when the shopkeeper guesses correctly, the audience claps. The game ends when the shopkeeper successfully sells the customers what they’re looking for.

Excuses, Excuses
This guessing game is for five players. One player, an employee, is late for work and leaves the room. The host is the boss and gets three reasons why someone is late, each reason becoming more unrealistic than the last. The remaining three players are co-workers, but they can only mime behind the boss’s back. They have to mime the suggestions in the same order that they were selected, and they have to pretend to be working if the boss turns around. The late employee comes in and has to guess the three reasons why they are late with the help of the co-workers and the audience. When the employee is getting close, the audience snaps and when the employee guesses correctly, the audience claps. The game is over when the employee guesses everything correctly.

FAMily Dinner
This game is played after the FAM interview. A few players stand on the back of the stage and are assigned to play people from the FAM’s life. These people include the FAM, their friends, enemies, and family members. When everyone is assigned, the host gets a holiday or some other event where all of these people are found together. The host then sits on the floor in front of the FAM and holds up their arms. As the scene goes on, the FAM has to decide if the characters are realistic or not. If the characters are accurate, the FAM will hit the host’s hand that corresponds with a “ding!” If the characters are not accurate, the FAM will hit the host’s hand that corresponds with “buzz!” and that character has to come up with a new line until they get a “ding!” This continues until the FAM feels like they can see their friends and family on stage.

Famous Last Words
Players form a line on the back of the stage. The host gets occupations, people, places, things, etc. from the audience and calls out one suggestion. The players in the line step up one at a time to give the famous last words of whatever was mentioned. For example, the famous last words of an air valve mechanic, “this sucks!” After a few players step forward, the host calls out a new suggestion.

Follow That Action
Two players start a scene on stage based on a location given by the host. At some point during the scene, someone or some object will leave the scene. A player that is off stage will yell “follow that [insert person or object] !” A new scene starts including that person or object that was called out, but stays somewhere within the first location mentioned. For example, if a scene started in the kitchen of a restaurant and a meatball left the scene, a new scene could start with the meatball flying into the main dining room. Objects and people continue to leave the scenes to move along the location.

Fortunately/Unfortunately
This is a game for four players. Two players stand on the front of the stage and take turns telling a story. One player always starts their sentence with “fortunately” and is relatively positive, while the other player always starts with “unfortunately” and is relatively negative. The two remaining players mime out the story as it is told.

Freeze Tag
This is a scene game, Two players start a scene on stage after getting a suggestion. When a player off stage sees an interesting position, they yell “freeze!” The two players freeze in place and that player comes on stage, tapping one of the players out. The player who was tapped leaves the stage and the one who just came on takes their exact position. A completely new scene starts based on the physicality and continues until someone else yells “freeze!” and the process is repeated again. If there are more than two players on stage, more than one player can be tapped out.

Good, Bad, and Ugly
Three players make a line on the back of the stage and the host asks the audience for topics to get advice on. One of the players gives good advice, one gives bad advice, and one give really ugly advice about the topic. After the advice is given, a few of the remaining players off stage have a quick 1-5 line scene inspired by some of the advice. When the short scene is done, a new topic is gotten and new advice is given.

Good Cop/Bad Cop
This is a guessing game for three players. One player leaves the room and the host gets three things from the audience: what the crime was, where it happened, and who the accomplice was. The two other players are cops who are good and bad, young and old, or other opposites. The cops give hints to the criminal so they can guess the three things, and the audience helps by snapping when the criminal is close and clapping when the criminal gets it. The game is over when the criminal confesses to everything correctly.

Greatest Hits
This is a singing game for six players. Two players host the game and get suggestions for song titles and genres from the audience. These become the inspiration for some of the greatest hits on the album. The other four players are singers and they perform the songs that the hosts talk about. Players step forward and there could be a solo, duet, trio, or quartet for the songs that are mentioned. The game can end with the hosts talking about the best song on the album, which could either tie all the songs together or be a stand alone piece. All of the players sing the song together and everyone can sing along to the chorus.

Growing and Shrinking
One player starts on stage and the rest start off stage. The player who begins on stage starts a scene by themselves. Once the scene starts to develop and a beat has passed, someone from offstage will clap. The first player freezes and whoever clapped comes on stage and starts a completely different scene based on the physical position of the first player. This scene goes on for a short bit and someone else will clap. Both players freeze, and the third player starts another new scene based on the player’s physicality. This continues until all players are on stage interacting in one scene. From here, the last player who came on stage is the first to leave and claps as they exit. Now the previous scene is resumed, and one by one, players clap themselves out in the reverse order they came on stage. When the first player is alone again, they finish their scene and the game ends.

Guidance Counselor
In this song game, one player is a school guidance counselor. The host asks the audience for three problems that certain people could have. Three players come in one at a time and sing about their problem to the counselor, and the counselor has to sing a solution back to them.

Helping Hands
This is a scene game for four players. Two players are able to do everything that they normally can, but they have to hold their hands behind their back. The two remaining players stand behind them and stick their own hands through the arm gaps to become the hands for the first two players. The players work together to create a normal scene.

Highlander
This is a mix of a scene game and an elimination game. The host gets a suggestion from the audience and four players act out a scene. At the end of the scene, the four players stand in a line for voting. The audience votes by enthusiastically clapping for who they want to see continue the scene. One player that gets the least amount of applause is eliminated, and the remaining three players perform the exact same scene again but have to make sure all four characters are played. The scene comes to an end again, and there is another round of voting. This is continued until one player is left to play all four characters. As the famous saying goes, “there can be only one!”

Interrogation Lineup
This is similar to Good Cop, Bad Cop, but there are more suspects. Two players are the witness and the investigator, and the rest of the players leave the room. The investigator gets three things from the audience: a crime that occurred, the location where it happened, and who was the accomplice. Once the three suggestions are gathered, the suspects line up on the back of the stage. The witness and investigator give hints to the suspects by calling them to step forward one at a time to defend their innocence. The audience also helps by snapping when the suspects are close to guessing correctly, and then clapping when the suspect gets it right. The game is over when a suspect confesses to all three things.

Irish Ditty
This is a song game for four players who stand in a line. The tune is Irish in nature and is sung one line at a time. A suggestion is gotten from the audience or the FAM board and the first player starts the song. The rhyme pattern is ABCB, and 8 lines makes 1 verse. After the first verse ends, the second player in line starts the second verse and the same pattern is repeated. When 4 verses are completed, the game is over.

Last Line, First Line
Three teams of two players stand on the back of the stage. The host gets three different suggestions from the audience and assigns them so each team has their own suggestion. One team steps forward and starts a scene related to their suggestion. At any time, either one of the other teams can clap if they hear a line that they can use in their unrelated scene. When a team claps, the current team stops and trades spots with the new team. The new team starts their own unrelated scene and has to say, word for word, the exact same line that the previous team said before they stopped. They can change the inflection, but the line has to stay exactly the same. This continues until a line of dialogue ties the three scenes together.

Lines from a Cup
The audience writes famous quotes, slogans, movie lines, etc. on paper slips and put them into a cup. Three players split these lines between themselves and put them in their pockets. The host gets a suggestion for a scene and the players start a scene. At random times, the players pull one line out of their pocket and use it as a line of dialogue in the scene.

Lines from a Cookie
Similar to Line from a Cup except the lines are put inside of fortune cookies.

Madam Zelda
This is a guessing game involving five players. One player, Madam Zelda, is guessing and leaves the room. The host is getting their fortune told and needs to get three suggestions from the audience, specifically something realistic that will happen to them soon, something unrealistic that will happen some time in the future, and something completely unrealistic that would never happen. Madam Zelda comes back in the room and has to figure out the three suggestions with the help of the last three players and the host. The three players are spirits and can only mime the suggestions in order. When Madam Zelda is getting close, the audience snaps their fingers, and when Madam Zelda guesses correctly, the audience claps. The game ends when everything is guessed correctly.

Marriage Counselor
This guessing game involves one player as a counselor and two players as a troubled married couple. The counselor leaves the room so they don’t know the issues, and the host asks the audience for problems for both players and one problem that they share together. For example, one of the players is obsessed with Shakira, the other player is deathly afraid of standing, and their shared problem is they can’t get their pet squirrel out of the bird feeder. The counselor has to guess these things while the couple gives hints. The audience helps by snapping their fingers when the counselor is close and then clap when the counselor gets it right. The game is over when the counselor guesses everything correctly.

Meanwhile
In this scene game, two players start a scene on stage. During the scene, one of the players will mention something that happened in another location, at another point in time, etc. and a player offstage will yell “Meanwhile at (that location)” and a new scene will start with new players. During the new scene at this different location, something else will be referenced, and the process is repeated.

Movie Critics
Two players are our movie critics and start discussing a made up movie. The fake title and a few details about the movie are taken from the audience. As the critics talk between themselves and set up a few plot points, the other players become the characters and act out scenes from the movie. The scenes can be paused to add commentary, add backstory, or it can fast forward to more interesting sections. Usually three scenes from the movie are performed.

New Born
In this guessing game, two players are proud parents of a bouncing baby… something. They have to figure out three things: who they both are and who their baby is. These three things can be famous people, places, objects, etc. The remaining players act as nurses, doctors, janitors, and patients and give hints to help the parents find out their identities. The audience helps by snapping their fingers when they guessers are close to the answer, and clap when the guessers get it right.

Party Quirks
One player is throwing a house party! They invited three guests over, but each of them have a special defining quirk that the party host doesn’t know about. Suggestions for quirks are taken from the audience and can range from famous people, to national monuments, to acting like objects. The guests give hints to the party host throughout the game and the audience helps by snapping when the party host is getting close and clapping when they get it right. The game is over when the party host guesses all the quirks correctly.

Pavlovian Response
This game is based on the famous physiologist Ivan Pavlov. In his spare time, he liked to ring bells at dogs. He discovered that if the dogs knew they would get food after hearing the bell, they would drool. In this case, the bell was the trigger and the drool was the response. We use this concept in this scene game by taking three players and giving them each one trigger and one response. One of the players is Pavlov and knows everyone’s trigger and response, while the other two players only know their own. For example, a trigger could be every time a player says the word “the” a player has to moo. All three players act out a scene and have to respond every single time they hear their trigger, even if they accidentally trigger themselves. Once the scene is over, the players announce what they think the other player’s triggers and responses were.

Pillars
This game is great for people who enjoy Mad Libs. The host gets a suggestion for a scene from the audience and four players get on stage. Two of the players sit in chairs on the front of the stage and the other two players start acting out a scene based on the suggestion. At different points during the scene, the players in the scene tap the players sitting in the chairs to fill in missing dialogue. When the sitting players are tapped, they have to blurt out one random word that does not have to fit into the scene. The players in the scene have to make that random word make sense in the scene and continue where they left off.

Post It
A line of players stands on the back of the stage. A folding chair covered in sticky notes is placed in the middle of the stage, and the sticky notes all have objects, occupations, etc. that are written by the audience. Two players at a time step forward and grab one sticky note each, read what is written aloud, and have a 1-3 line scene to connect the two sticky notes in a way that makes sense. Once the short scene is finished, the players return to their spots and two new players step forward to repeat the process again.

Press Conference
In this guessing game, there are four players. One player leaves the room and three players sit on a bench on stage. The three players on stage are journalists who give hints to help the guessing player figure out what famous person they are and what unrelated invention they are presenting about. The guessing player has no idea who they are or what they invented. The audience helps by snapping their fingers when the guesser is getting close to the right answer, and then clap when the guesser gets it right.

Questions
“How do I play this game?” Excellent start! This game is played by only asking questions. Two players start on the stage and the rest form a line off stage. The host gets a suggestion and the two players on stage start a scene by only asking each other questions. If a player says a statement, repeats a question already asked by the other player, uses rhetorical questions, or otherwise says unrelated questions that don't help drive the scene, that player is out. They go to the back of the line and the next person in line takes their place.

Quickest Minute
Three players start on stage and the host gets a favorite movie, childhood story, etc. from the audience. The three players are timed and have to act out the entire story in just 60 seconds. Once the minute is up, the same story is performed again in 30 seconds, then 10, so on and so forth.

Quick Scenes
This game is based on quick 1-3 line scenes. Players stand in a line on the back of the stage and a suggestion is taken from the audience. Two players at a time will step forward and have a 1-3 line scene inspired by the suggestion, returning to their spot when they are done. Once the suggestion has run its course, someone from the line will step forward and ask for a new suggestion to inspire more quick scenes. This process continues until the game reaches a high point.

Remake
The host, acting as a movie director, gets suggestions for a scene or a fake movie title from the audience. Two or three players act out a scene until the director calls cut. The players who just did the scene are “fired” and new players take their places. We see the same scene performed again, but this time the scene is influenced by some sort of genre that is taken from the audience, like drama or RomCom. The scene is performed with three or so genres, and then the director calls scene.

Revolver
Four players, A, B, C, and D each pick one corner of the stage. The host gets a suggestion for a scene from the audience and assigns it to players A and B on the front corners. The host then says “rotate right” and everyone rotates clockwise on the stage. Then the host gets another suggestion and players B and C have a separate, new scene together. Rotate right again, new suggestion, and players C and D have a separate scene together. Rotate right one more time, new suggestion, and players D and A have a separate scene together. Throughout the game, the host will be rotating between these four scenes by either calling “rotate right,” known as clockwise, or “rotate left,” known as counterclockwise. Each time the scenes are revisited after rotating, the players can pick up right where they left off or go hours, months, or years into the future.

Rope
A line of players is formed on the back of the stage. Player A stands on the corner of the stage facing the audience and does a repetitive action. Player B, who is at the front of the line, is facing the back wall so they do not see Player A’s action. The host tells Player B when to turn around, and Player B has to deliver a simple statement such as “I love owls” or “It’s chilly in here.” Player A has to say a line of their own to justify their action with Player B’s statement. If Player A is not successful, the audience yells “Rope!” Player A comes up with a new action, Player B comes up with a new statement, and the process is repeated. If Player A is able to justify successfully, the audience cheers and they go to the back of the line, every player moves over one spot, and the process is repeated.

Say It Again
This is a scene game. The host gets a suggestion from the audience and two players start on stage. At any point during the scene, the host can ding the bell. Whoever spoke last has to say something completely different from what was just said. For example, “I love your hair!” Ding “My leg just went numb” Ding “I never thought I would get out of med school.” The last sentence that was not dinged, in this case never getting out of med school, is now justified into the scene.

Serious Scene
The host gets a suggestion from the audience and two players start a very serious scene. The other players wait off stage and are ready to jump on at any second. If for any reason during the scene someone laughs, smirks, guffaws, snorts, smiles, etc. the player(s) that caused the ruckus are immediately fired by the host and immediately replaced by a player waiting off stage. The player that rushes to fill the spot must pick up exactly where the scene left off, becoming the same character that was there before. This constant firing and replacing continues for the entirety of the game, and sometimes a third absurd character makes an entrance.

Short Cutz
A few players start a scene on stage. At any time, any players off stage can use editing tools to change the scene in some way. Some of these editing tools are tapping a player out, moving time, changing location, adding elements, or just wiping the scene to start a new unrelated scene. Any other forms of editing that can be thought of can also be used.

Sing It
Two players start on stage acting out a scene. At any time during the scene, the host or an audience member dings a bell and whoever spoke last has to create a song inspired by what was said. The player decides how long the song will be, and the scene resumes where it left off when the song stops.

Sit, Stand, Lie Down
Three players start on stage in this scene game. They always have to either be sitting, standing, or lying down. The catch is, there can never be more than one person in any of these three positions. For example, if a player sits, then the player that was previously sitting either needs to stand up or lie down. In addition, any player that moves needs to justify why they did in a way that makes sense in the scene.

Spelling Bee
Players stand in a line on the stage and the host gets a simple word from the audience. All of the players say the word in unison, then they go down the line spelling the word one letter at a time, ending the word by saying it in unison once again. The host then asks the players for the definition of the word or asks for it it be used in a sentence. The players give either the sentence or the definition one word at a time, and finish by saying the word in unison one last time. The host gets a new word and the process is repeated.

Slogans
Players stand in a line on the stage and the host gets suggestions like nouns, objects, and occupations from the audience. The players step forward one at a time and deliver slogans to sell those suggestions as products.

Sports Commentator
The host gets an everyday activity from the audience, such as mowing the lawn or washing the dishes, and presents it as an Olympic or world championship event. Two players are commentators, and two other players are athletes. There is also an on-the-field reporter who can be a referee, cheerleader, taste tester, or whatever else the competition calls for. The athletes go head to head in whatever activity is chosen, and the commentators talk about everything happening within the scene. The commentators have the ability to use slow motion, replay something that happened, or whatever else they may think of. The game ends after a winner is chosen.

Story, Story, Die
Players stand in a line on the stage. The host sits in the audience and asks for story suggestions such as a title, main characters, conflict, etc. The host conducts the story by pointing at individual players. When the host points at a player, that player has to begin telling the story from where it left off and continue talking until another player is singled out. This could mean starting in the middle of a sentence, a word, or even speaking simultaneously. If a player stumbles over their words or cannot continue telling the story perfectly, then the host kills them in a unique way inspired by the story. The last player left alive finishes the story and the game ends.

Tableau
Players start off stage. The host gets a location from the audience and one at a time, the players represent objects, people, etc. that could be found in that location. For example, if the location was a barber shop, a player could say “I am a leather chair” and freeze, striking a pose that resembles a chair. Someone else could come on as something like a customer who sits in the chair, a pair of scissors, or they could do something else entirely. Once a handful of players are frozen on stage, the host will ask one of them a question about the scene, their motivation, or anything else the host chooses. After this, the stage is cleared and a new suggestion is called for.

Timmy in the Well
This is a guessing game that plays off of the hit TV series Lassie. One player, the owner of three “dogs,” leaves the room. The owner has to guess who a famous or popular person is, what happened to this person, and a location where it happened. For example, Thomas Edison mailed thank you cards at a farmers market. It's up to the three “dogs” to work together by miming to give hints to the owner, seeing as Lassie couldn't speak. The audience also helps by snapping their fingers when the owner is close to guessing correctly, and then clapping when the owner gets it right.

Trolley Stop
A line is formed off stage. Person A starts by waiting on the bench at our trolley stop. Person B enters with a larger than life character, emotion, trait, etc. and Person A’s job is to mirror them as closely as possible in their speech and movement. Once Person A thinks they’ve got it perfect, they will find a reason to leave and return to the back of the line. Person B sits on the bench and the process starts over again.

Try That On For Size
A line is formed off stage. Person A starts on one side of the stage and Person B starts on the other side. Person A is given an activity by the host and begins to do a repetitive action inspired by that activity. For example, if the suggestion is playing basketball, Person A could say “I am shooting a basketball, try that on for size” followed by a repetitive throwing motion. Person B copies the same action, but has to come up with something different that could still make sense, such as “I am swatting a fly, try that on for size.” The players go back and forth, finishing their sentence with ”try that on for size” until one of them runs out of ideas or repeats something that has already been said. The player who ran out of ideas leaves the stage, a new player takes their place, and the host gets a new activity.

Two Headed Monster
Three players start on stage. Two of them pair up by linking arms and transform into our Monster. The Monster can only speak one word at a time by alternating between its two heads, and they act as a single being. The last player is independant and able to speak however they want. The Monster and the independent player work together to create a scene that (maybe) makes sense.

Typewriter
Two Narrators sit on a bench off to the side of the stage with a mimed typewriter. One of them begins typing aloud, and they work together to get basic elements such as characters, conflict, etc. for the story that is about to take place. The remaining players work together to bring the story to life based on the elements given by the Narrators. At any point, the Narrators can freeze the scene, add in characters or locations, fast forward time, or even scrap the whole scene or story to start fresh.

Welcome Song
We create a song inspired by the Featured Audience Member interview to welcome them to our show! Each player dedicates a stanza to our lovely FAM.

What Are You Doing?
A line is formed off stage. Person A starts on stage by acting out an activity. Person B enters and asks “What are you doing?” Person A says a completely different activity that they are NOT doing and goes to the back of the line. Person B begins acting out the activity that Person A said they were NOT doing, and the process is repeated when the next person in line asks “What are you doing?” For example, if Person A is walking a dog, they could respond to the question by saying “I’m skydiving.” Person B then skydives.

World's Worst
Players form a line along the back of the stage and are given a noun, occupation, etc. by the host. One at a time, players step forward to deliver a one liner inspired by the WORST example of the suggestion, and then return to their place in the line. If the suggestion was “lifeguard,” an example could be “Help I’m drowning!” Players continue delivering one liners until a new suggestion is given or the host ends the game.
 
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